Today: Home  |  Your Aviation Newsletter  |  Webmasters Click Here  
Aviation History - Home Page

America The Beautiful!
Fly it High!

  Launch Pad !
Aviation Headlines
Aviation Fun Facts
B17 & P51 Gallery
LT Bomber Specs.
Book Descriptions
(Started April 20, 2005)
Aviation Articles
Aviation Clip Art
Aviation Gallery
Aviation Timeline
Search Our Site

  Aviation History

Aviation History Magazine  6 issues

 
Click Here to Buy

  Sponsor


  Distributor List

 
•  Magazania.com
•  MagazineCity.net
•  Magmall.com

  General Interest
 Glider For Sale
 Current News
 Find Military Buddies
 Open Your E-mail
 Today In History

  Sign In - MORE INFO.

 
•  Sign Guest Book
•  Read Guest Book

  Contact Us

•  Website Only:
B2B or Webmaster

 
•  2005 Ad Rates

Click to bookmark Aviation History

  The Bravest Heroes

 
IAFF Online
•  IAFF Online
•  FDNY History
•  Rev. Mychal Judge
 
•  Mail Safety - USPS

  Milesource.com

Milesource
  Aviation History - Aerospace News

  

  Aviation and Technology News


Saturday, February 22, 2003 (Washington)

Columbia struck by three chunks of foam

The space shuttle Columbia may have been struck by as many as three large chunks of foam that smashed against delicate insulating tiles as it took off, not just the one noted previously, according to an internal analysis disclosed by NASA.

The report by employees at The Boeing Co., a contractor, revealed that cameras saw three large pieces of debris, each up to 20 inches long, that shattered into a shower of particles after striking Columbia along its left wing. The report, among those supporting Boeing's assurances to NASA that Columbia could return safely, was dated eight days before the spacecraft broke apart Feb.1 over Texas.

Earlier Boeing reports during Columbia's flight had focused on possible damage from "a large piece of debris," also about 20 inches.

Senior NASA officials have steadfastly supported Boeing's conclusions since the accident that Columbia was expected to be able to return safely.

NASA yesterday released three reports analyzing possible damage to Columbia's insulating tiles. News organizations had previously obtained two of these. The third, dated Jan. 24, indicated the highest risk of damage was along the leading edge of Columbia's left wing, based on the speed and on the angle of the strike as the shuttle roared skyward.

The accident board investigating the disaster has said previously that Columbia almost certainly suffered a devastating breach along its wing and possibly its wheel compartment that allowed searing air to seep inside the shuttle during its fiery descent at nearly 12,500 mph.

Copyright 2003 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. The information contained in the AP News report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press.

AviationHistory.org shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.



In The News: Shuttle Columbia, AP.org

  Tsunami Relief - How To Help - Donation Information

Tsunami Relief - http://www.usafreedomcorps.gov/

The most effective way people can assist relief efforts is by making cash contributions to humanitarian organizations that are conducting relief operations.

CLICK HERE TO DONATE.


Home  |  Guestbook  |  Contact Us  |  Advertise With Us  |  LINKS - Add URL
Using: Excite.com Paid Inclusion Addr.com Host 1998 - 2005 Aviation History .org / All Rights Reserved
Privacy Policy.